Skeletons found near Durham cathedral were Oliver Cromwell’s prisoners

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Archaeologists shed new light on 365-year-old mystery by identifiying remains of one of bloodiest battles of English civil war

One of the skeletons discovered in a mass grave in Durham that have been identified as the remains of Scottish prisoners after Battle of Dunbar in 1650. Photograph: Craig Connor/NNP/Durham University/PA

One of the skeletons discovered in a mass grave in Durham that have been identified as the remains of Scottish prisoners after Battle of Dunbar in 1650. Photograph: Craig Connor/NNP/Durham University/PA

The Guardian online edition, 2 Sep 2015

Skeletons found in two mass graves next to Durham cathedral have been revealed to be the remains of Scottish soldiers taken prisoner on the orders of Oliver Cromwell in one of the bloodiest battles of the 17th-century civil wars.

Archaeologists at Durham University on Wednesday published the results of more than 18 months’ research into the mystery of the jumbled skeletons of between 17 and 28 people that had lain untouched for more than 350 years.

The research team said the only plausible explanation was that the skeletons are those of Scottish soldiers taken prisoner after the English parliamentarian army’s victory at the 1650 Battle of Dunbar.

The complete article from The Guardian can be read —> HERE.

Thanks to my Facebook friend, Heather Wilkinson Rojo, for sharing this article from The Guardian about archeological discoveries related to the Battle of Dunbar. Two of Heather’s ancestors, William Munroe and Alexander Thompson, survived this battle, the death march to London, the trip to America and being sold into servitude on the dock of Charlestown, Massachusetts. My own 8th g-grandfather, William Tosh (1635-1685) was also a survivor of the battle. He was deported to Massachusetts in 1651 or early 1652 and was indentured as a worker at the Saugus Iron Works before relocating to Block Island, Rhode Island in 1661. I have related what I know of him —> HERE.

 

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