Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution

I have found many connections to my ancestors in applications accepted over the years by the Sons of the American Revolution and the Daughters of the American Revolution genealogical societies:

“The Minuteman” (1900) by Henry Hudson Kitson stands at the town green of Lexington, Massachusetts.

“The Minuteman” (1900) by Henry Hudson Kitson stands at the town green of Lexington, Massachusetts.

General George Washington leads the Continental Army in the Battle of Princeton during the American Revolutionary War. (Getty images)

General George Washington leads the Continental Army in the Battle of Princeton during the American Revolutionary War. (Getty images)

 

Joseph Allen (1758-1838), paternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #15758 (Application of Oscar D. Allen accepted 15 May 1903, Illinois Society)[1]

Joseph Allen. A private in Capt. William Hudson Ballard’s company 7th Massachusetts Regiment[2]… commanded by Colonel Ichabod Alden. The company was also designated as Capt. [illegible] company . His name is on a master roll of the company drafted July 1, 1777 which shows him enlisted March 4th for three years. etc.

Allen’s regiment saw action at the Battles of Saratoga, the Cherry Valley Massacre and the Sullivan Expedition.

 

Moses Andrews (1755-1848), maternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #15411 (Application of Ernest Herbert Hills accepted 21 Jan 1903, California Society)

Moses Andrews entered the army at Farmington, Connecticut in 1776 as a private in the 3rd company, Cpt. Heart, 2nd regiment Colonel Wolcott, Connecticut State Troops. He was at Boston under Gen. Washington in December 1776. Term of enlistment three (3) months. Reference: Connecticut Men of the Revolution, page 383.

 

Robert Badgley (1740- 1783), maternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #21345 (Application of Edwin McCumber Skinner accepted 20 Oct 1909, Empire State Society)

Robert Badgley was a private in Capt. Chandler’s company of the First Essex County N.J. Militia.  Was in the battle at Springfield, N.J.[3]

The Battle of Springfield. Paining by John Ward Dunsmore (d. 1945) - original is in Fraunces Tavern, New York City.

The Battle of Springfield. Painting by John Ward Dunsmore (d. 1945) – original is in Fraunces Tavern, New York City.

 

Reuben Baker (1758-1811), paternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #33356 (Application of Ray Cursons Neal accepted 5 Dec 1919, New York State Society)

Private in the Massachusetts troops

 

Nathaniel Hamlin (1738- 1818), paternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #26603 (Application of Byron Eugene Hamlin accepted 6 Jun 1914, Michigan Society)

Capt. Nathaniel Hamlin, as he was called in the Hamlin Genealogy page 142 and in the inscription in his gravestone at Sharon Village, Conn. was appointed ensign of Third Company in Sharon, October 1771; lieutenant, May 1772 and first lieutenant, June 1776. Asa Cornelius and Thomas Hamlin were privates in the same company, which was commanded by Captain Edward Rogers and attached to Colonel Fisher Gays’ Second Battalion in General James Wadsworth’s Connecticut brigade of six battalions. This brigade was raised in 1776 to reinforce General George Washington in New Jersey and fought at the battle of Long Island and was at White Plains in active service until December 25, 1776, when their time expired.

Washington evacuating the Coninental Army -  175th Anniversary Issue of 1951. Flat bottom ferry boats in East River are depicted in the background.

Washington evacuating the Continental Army – 175th Anniversary Issue of 1951. Flat bottom ferry boats in East River are depicted in the background.

 

Matthew Henderson (1749-1796), maternal 4th g-grandfather – SAR #45586 (Application of Roderick Henderson Watkins accepted 18 May 1928, Minnesota Society)

Organized a company of one hundred and four (104) men in Shippensburg, Pa., Captain 9th Pennsylvania[4] Continental Line.  See History of Cumberland County Pa., Rev. C.P. Wing, Page 252 (Heitman p. 284)…  Matthew Henderson is said to be buried in Middle Spring Church Cemetery.

 

Douglas King (1729-1816), paternal 6th g-grandfather – SAR #35900 (Application of Charles Sanford King accepted 1 Jun 1921, Empire State Society)

Private in Capt. Ebenzer Sheldon’s company of 2nd Hampshire County Regiment[5] of Massachusetts Militia.

 

Phineas King (1760-1810), paternal 5th g-grandfather – From Massachusetts Soliders and Sailors in the War of Revolution, Volume 9 (Boston, Massachusetts: Wright & Potter) 1902. p. 269

Descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. John Glover, at Springfield, July 11, 1780; age, 19 yrs.; stature, 5 ft. 6 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town of Southampton; marched to camp July 11, 1780, under command of Capt. George Webb; also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Southampton for service in the Continental Army during 1780; marched to camp July 11, 1780; discharged Dec. 8, 1780; service, 5 mos. 3 days, including travel (120 miles) home; also, Drummer, Capt. Ebenezer Sheldon’s (7th) co. of volunteers, 2d Hampshire Co. regt.; service against the insurgents at Hadley June 13, and at Northampton June 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17, 1782, 6 days; also, Capt. Ebenezer Sheldon’s (7th) co., 2d Hampshire Co. regt.; service, 3 days; company ordered to Springfield to protect the sitting of the Supreme Judicial Court Sept. 28, 1784.

 

John Major (1740-1808), paternal 6th g-grandfather – SAR #24967 (Application of David Garfield Gunnell accepted 15 Jun 1929, Far Eastern Society)

Private in Va. Troops.

 

Jesse Mason (1737-1823), paternal 6th g-grandfather – SAR #63658 (Application of David Monroe Nichols accepted 10 Mar 1944, Maryland Society)

Private in Captain Daniel Brown’s company, Col. Benjamin Simon’s regiment in 1777 and 1780.  Massachusetts Troops.  At the Battle of Bennington[6].

Print of the Battle of Bennington [Vermont], 1777. Courtesy of the New York Public Library Digital Collection (circa 1900)

Print of the Battle of Bennington [Vermont], 1777. Courtesy of the New York Public Library Digital Collection (circa 1900)

 

William McComb (1757-1835), maternal 4th g-grandfather – SAR #45586 (Application of Roderick Henderson Watkins accepted 18 May 1928, Minnesota Society)

Sarah McComb was the daughter of William McComb born 1757 died Feb. 10, 1835 and his legal and lawful wife, Rebecca Kearsley.  He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and a prisoner on board the prison ship “Jersey”[7].

The Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn, New York

The Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn, New York

 

Isaac Morris (1741-1828), maternal 5th g-grandfather – from The Official Roster of the Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried in the State of Ohio, complied by Frank D. Henderson et. al. and published by the State of Ohio (Columbus, Ohio: F.J. Heer Printing Co.) 1929. Page 263

“Wagonmaster, Morris Co, NJ Mil, “Stryker’s” p 853. Br 1753, Morristown, N. J. Parents: Daniel Morris and wife Hannah (see records of Morristown, N. J. Presbyterian Church). Mar. Rebecca Hathaway May 11, 1768. (p 54, Church Records, Morristown, N. J.) Both received into church Mch 2, 1776. Children: Benjamin, Jacob, John, Robert, Tunis, (died), Child (died 1773). All baptized Morristown, N J. 3 buried 1772 and 1773. D Lebanon and buried in Presbyterian churchyard. In 1778 Isaac Morris came to Columbia, perhaps, then on to Cincinnati about 1789. One of eight charter members of First Presbyterian Church Cincinnati 1790. He removed to Warren Co before 1800, Sec. 19, northwest of Lebanon. Founder of Turtle Creek Church and when it disbanded a founder of Lebanon Presbyterian Church. Benjamin came with his father to these places and lived near him. His home still standing, 1920, one time known as “Green Tree” tavern. Marriages of other sons secured from Mrs. Whallon. Ref: Church Records, Morristown, N. J. Records copied from family Bible and headstone by Rosamond Fraser, Dayton, O. Filed by Mrs. Whallon, Cincinnati D. A. R. Fur infor Cincinnati Chap.”

 

“The Minuteman” (1900) by Henry Hudson Kitson stands at the town green of Lexington, Massachusetts. Lexington was the site of “the shot heard ’round the world”. The line is originally from the opening stanza of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Concord Hymn” (1837) and referred to the beginning of the American Revolutionary War. This 1775 first shot was fired during an armed standoff between British forces and local militia in Lexington, escalating into engagements at the Old North Bridge in the battles of Lexington and Concord.

“The Minuteman” (1900) by Henry Hudson Kitson stands at the town green of Lexington, Massachusetts. Lexington was the site of “the shot heard ’round the world”. The line is originally from the opening stanza of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Concord Hymn” (1837) and referred to the beginning of the American Revolutionary War. This 1775 first shot was fired during an armed standoff between British forces and local militia in Lexington, escalating into engagements at the Old North Bridge in the battles of Lexington and Concord.

Matthias Spinning (1750-1830), maternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #21079 (Application of Alva Lacy Spinning, M.D. accepted 8 Aug 1909, Indiana Society) and SAR #32507 (Application of Lynne John Bevan accepted 29 Mar 1919, New Jersey Society)

Private and Minute Man for about 8 years in the Essex Co. Militia of New Jersey, Continental Army.  He was taken prisoner and confined in a sugar house prison in New York for several months and served until the end of the Revolutionary War.

 

John Starke (1715-1782), paternal 7th g-grandfather

 

John Suggett (1751-1834), paternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #49872 (Application of George William Johnson accepted 18 Feb 1930, Cincinnati Chapter of the Ohio Society)

Assisted in the defense of Bryant’s Station.

 

William Thomson (1727-1781), paternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #35935 (Application of Lester Gardner accepted 4 Nov 1921, Empire State Society)

Captain of a Virginia state regiment, Jun 1777 to Apr 1781.

 

John James Trabue (1722-1803), paternal 6th g-grandfather – SAR #50315 (Application of Allen Phillip Allensworth accepted 13 Jun 1930, Illinois State Society)

John Trabue served in the Revolutionary War as Ensign, and in consideration for said service which warranted it, he was placed on half pay rolls, State of Virginia.  Ensign 5th Virginia 15 May 1782 and served to the close of the War. * Note * His full name was John James Trabue but it was general a soldier used but one name.

 

Thomas Carr Waller (1732-1787), paternal 6th g-grandfather – SAR #60915 (Application of Lewis Garland Chewning accepted 18 Feb 1942, Virginia Society)

Thomas Waller of Spotsylvania Co. Va. was a private in the 6th Continental Line and received a pension for his services.

 

Samuel Wallace (1730-1798), maternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #17165 (Application of Charles C. Pavey accepted 31 Jan 1905, Benjamin Franklin Chapter of the Ohio Society)

In 1777, served as Captain of the 5th Company, in Col. William Chamber’s 3rd Battalion, of the Associators of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and in 1778, served as Captain of the 5th Company, in Col. William Chamber’s 3rd Battalion, of the Cumberland County Militia [Allen Township].

 

Barrett White (1727-1782),  paternal 6th g-grandfather

 

Amos York (1730-1778), paternal 5th g-grandfather – SAR #38862 (Application of Charles Albert Lafferty accepted 20 Jun 1928, South Dakota Society)

Amos York was an active and ardent Whig. In 1778 he was captured by Indians and Tories, taken prisoner and held for nine months in Canada, when he was exchanged in New York. Early espousing the colonial cause he entered the service on the breaking out of the revolution. When he at last escaped from Quebec, his daughter met him on the way. Tradition says that his daughter ransomed him from the Indians.

Depiction of the Battle of Wyoming by Alonzo Chappel, 1858

Depiction of the Battle of Wyoming by Alonzo Chappel, 1858

 


[1] Also SAR #28938 (Application of Wilfrid Knox Smith accepted 25 Jan 1917, Nebraska Society)

[2] The 7th Massachusetts Regiment, constituted on 16 Sep 1776 and originally known as Alden’s Regiment from its first colonel, Ichabod Alden, was an infantry regiment of the Continental Army. It was organized as seven companies of volunteers from Worcester, Middlesex, Essex, York, Cumberland, Hampshire, Lincoln and Suffolk Counties of the colony of Massachusetts. The regiment was furloughed on 12 Jun 1783 at West Point, New York and disbanded on 15 Nov 1783. The regiment saw action at the Battles of Saratoga, the Cherry Valley Massacare and the Sullivan Expedition.

Historical marker - Springfield, New Jersey

Historical marker – Springfield, New Jersey

[3] The Battle of Springfield was fought during the American Revolutionary War on 23 Jun 1780. This was one of the last major engagements of the Revolutionary War in the north and effectively put an end to British ambitions in New Jersey. Because the decisive battles of the war moved further south, Springfield became known as the “forgotten victory.” Washington praised the role of the New Jersey Militia in the battle, writing, “They flew to arms universally and acted with a spirit equal to anything I have seen in the course of the war”

[4] The 9th Pennsylvania Regiment was authorized 16 Sep 1776 and was assigned to the main Continental Army on 27 Dec 1776. It was organized during the spring of 1777 to consite of eight companies of volunteers from Westmoreland, Lancaster, Chester, Philadelphia and Cumberland counties of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The regiment was assigned to the 3d Pennsylvania Brigade of the main Continental Army on 27 May 1777. On 1 Jul 1778 the regiment was re-organized to eight companies. On 22 Jul 1778 the regiment was re-assigned to the 2d Pennsylvania Brigade. It was consolidated with the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment on 17 Jan 1781 and re-designated as the 5th Pennsylvania Regiment and concurrently furloughed at Trenton, New Jersey. The regiment would see action during the Battle of Brandywine, Battle of Germantown, Battle of Monmouth and the Battle of Springfield.

[5] May’s Regiment of Militia also known as the 2nd Hampshire County Militia Regiment was called up at Southampton, Massachusetts on 20 Sep 1777 as reinforcements for the Continental Army during the Saratoga Campaign. The regiment marched quickly to join the gathering forces of Gen. Horatio Gates as he faced British General John Burgoyne in northern New York. The regiment served in General Nixon’s brigade. With the surrender of Burgoyne’s Army on 17 Oct 1777, the regiment was the next day.

[6] The Battle of Bennington was a battle of the American Revolutionary War that took place on 16 Aug 1777, in Walloomsac, New York, about 10 miles from its namesake Bennington, Vermont. A rebel force of 2,000 men, primarily composed of New Hampshire and Massachusetts militiamen, led by General John Stark, and reinforced by men led by Colonel Seth Warner and members of the Green Mountain Boys, decisively defeated a detachment of General John Burgoyne’s army led by Lieutenant Colonel Friedrich Baum, and supported by additional men under Lieutenant Colonel Heinrich von Breymann.

image[7] HMS Jersey was a 60-gun fourth rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 14 Jun 1736. She is perhaps most noted for her service as a prison ship during the American Revolutionary War. One of the most gruesome chapters in the story of America’s struggle for independence from Britain occurred in the waters of New York Harbor, near the current location of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. From 1776-83, the British forces occupying New York City used abandoned or decommissioned warships anchored just offshore to hold those soldiers, sailors and private citizens they had captured in battle or arrested on land or at sea (many for refusing to swear an oath of allegiance to the British Crown). Some 11,000 prisoners died aboard the prison ships over the course of the war, many from disease or malnutrition. Many of these were inmates of the notorious HMS Jersey, which earned the nickname “Hell” for its inhumane conditions and the obscenely high death rate of its prisoners. The remains of those that died aboard the prison ships were reinterred in Fort Greene Park after the 1808 burial vault near the Brooklyn Navy Yard had collapsed. In 1908, one hundred years after the burial ceremony, the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument was dedicated.

(1137)

Your comments are welcome. Keep in mind, however, all comments are moderated, and please no off-topic links.