Meyer #3634

Jan Dirckszen Meyer (1625-1700)

Born in Netherlands.  Arrived in New Amsterdam (New York) by 1652 and

Tryntje Andries Grevenraet (1630-1677)

Born in Netherlands.  Arrived in New Amsterdam (New York) by 1652.

Meyer #3634

Jan Dirckszen Meyer (also known as Jan Meyers) was probably born in Amsterdam, Holland about 1625-30.  About 1647 in Holland he married Tryntje Andries Grevenraet, daughter of Andries Grevenraet and Metje Jans.  She was born in Holland, but the date of her birth is not known (perhaps about 1630).  Jan and Tryntje immigrated to New Netherland and settled on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam, later New York) by to 25 Jan 1652, when their names are recorded in the membership rolls of the Dutch Church in New Amsterdam. They were still in New York on 16 October 1673 when an ordinance was passed requiring the removal of certain houses situated against the city wall, including the home of Jan and Tryntje.  In 1674 Jan, his son Andries and another man were granted a tract of land in New Amsterdam by the Dutch governor Anthony Colve, and the land may have been granted in compensation for the loss of their previous home when the walls of New York were fortified a year earlier.

Trynntje died prior to 25 Nov 1677[1]Jan Dirckszen Meyer died 17 January 1700 at New York City, New York.

Beyond these details, not much is known of this family.

The children of Jan Dirckszen Meyer and Tryntje Andries Grevenraet are listed as follows:

  1. Dirckje Meyer, see below
  2. Andries Meyer, born about 1650
  3. Johannes Jansen Meyer, born 25 Feb 1651/52
  4. Lysbeth Meyer, born 31 Jan 1654/55
  5. Pieter Meyer, born 25 Mar 1657
  6. Elsje Meyer, born 25 Feb 1662/63

    The longest continuous congregation in New Jersey is the Old Bergen Church in Jersey City. It began at the time of Dutch settlement in the area; its more than 340-year history grants it a special place in the history of Jersey City. The third and present structure, now called the Old Bergen Church, was built in 1841 on the site of the old parsonage and dedicated on 14 Jul 1842. (photo credit: wallyg)

    The longest continuous congregation in New Jersey is the Old Bergen Church in Jersey City. It began at the time of Dutch settlement in the area; its more than 340-year history grants it a special place in the history of Jersey City. The third and present structure, now called the Old Bergen Church, was built in 1841 on the site of the old parsonage and dedicated on 14 Jul 1842. (photo credit: wallyg)

Dirckje Meyer was also known as Dirckje Meyers or Dircksje Frederica Meyers in some records.  She died shortly before 5 October 1688, when she was buried at Bergen, Hudson County, New Jersey.  On 20 Jun 1670 at Bergen Church, Jersey City, New Jersey she married Enoch Michielsen Vreeland, who was born at Pavonia, New Jersey or New Amsterdam (New York City) on 20 Jan 1647 and died 17 Aug 1717 in New Jersey.  Their lineage is continued under the heading of Michiel Jansen Vreeland (1610-1663).



[1] This is the date on which her husband published his intent to marry his second wife, Baertje (Kip) Wanshaer (widow of Jan Wanshaer) in New York.

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