Borden Lizzie

Lizzie Borden (1860-1927), 7th cousin 3x removed

Lizzie Andrew Borden (1860-1927)

Lizzie Andrew Borden (1860-1927)

Lizzie Andrew Borden was an American woman who was tried and acquitted in 1893 for the 1892 axe murders of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts.

Lizzie and her sister, Emma, lived with their father, Andrew Borden, and stepmother, Abby (Durfee Gray) Borden, into adulthood.  On 4 Aug 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden were found murdered in their home.  Lizzie was arrested and tried for the axe murders.  She was acquitted in 1893 and continued to live in Fall River until her death, on 1 Jun 1927.  The case was never solved, and speculation about the crimes still continues more than 100 years later.

Early Life: Lizzie Andrew Borden was born on July 19, 1860, in Fall River, Massachusetts, to Sarah and Andrew Borden.  Soon thereafter, Sarah Borden died.  Andrew Borden remarried three years later, to Abby Durfee Gray.  The family lived well.  Andrew Borden was successful enough in the fields of manufacturing and real estate development to support his wife and two daughters, Emma and Lizzie, and employ servants to keep their home in order.  Both Emma and Lizzie lived with their father and stepmother into adulthood.

Emma Borden (left) & Lizzie Borden (right) photos

Emma Borden (left) & Lizzie Borden (right) photos

The relationship between the Borden sisters and their stepmother, Abby Borden, was not close.  They greeted her as “Mrs. Borden” and worried that Abby Borden’s family sought to gain access to their father’s money.  Emma was protective of her younger sister and, together, the two sisters helped to manage the rental properties owned by Andrew Borden.  The family attended the Congregationalist Church, an institution in which Lizzie was particularly involved.

Borden Murders and Trial: On the morning of 4 Aug 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden were murdered and mutilated in their Fall River home.  Lizzie Borden alerted the maid, Bridget, to her father’s dead body.  He had been attacked and killed while sleeping on the sofa.  A search of the home led to the discovery of the body of Abby Borden in an upstairs bedroom.  Like her husband, Abby Borden was the victim of a brutal hatchet attack.

Policemen called to the scene suspected Lizzie immediately, although she was not taken into custody at that time.  Her sister, Emma, was out of town at the time and was never a suspect.  During the week between the murders and her arrest, Lizzie burned a dress that she claimed was stained with paint.  Prosecutors would later allege that the dress was stained with blood, and that Lizzie had burned the dress in order to cover up her crime.

Lizzie Borden was indicted on 2 Dec 1892.  Her widely publicized trial began the following June in New Bedford.  Borden did not take the stand in her own defense and her inquest testimony was not admitted into evidence.  The testimony provided by others proved inconclusive.  On 20 Jun 1893, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murders.  No one else was ever charged with the crimes.

Later Life: Lizzie and Emma Borden inherited a significant portion of their father’s estate, which allowed them to purchase a new home together.  The Borden sisters lived together for the following decade.  Although free, Lizzie was considered guilty by many of her neighbors, and thusly never enjoyed acceptance in the community following her trial.  Her reputation was further tarnished when she was accused of shoplifting in 1897.

In 1905, Emma Borden abruptly moved out of the house that she shared with her sister.  The two never spoke again.  Emma may have been uncomfortable with Lizzie’s close friendship with another woman, Nance O’Neil, although her silence on the issue has fueled speculation that she learned new details about the murders of her father and stepmother.  No member of the household staff ever offered additional information on the rift, even following Lizzie’s death.

Lizzie Borden died of pneumonia in Fall River, Massachusetts, on 1 Jun 1927.  Emma Borden died days later in Newmarket, New Hampshire.

The case was memorialized in a popular skipping-rope rhyme:

Lizzie Borden took an ax
And gave her mother forty whacks.
When she saw what she had done,
She gave her father forty-one.

Folklore says that the rhyme was made up by an anonymous writer as a tune to sell newspapers.  Others attribute it to the ubiquitous, but anonymous, “Mother Goose”.  In reality, Lizzie’s stepmother suffered 18 or 19 blows, and her father suffered 11 blows.

Click — > “Lizzie Borden and Ancestors” to read an article by Alice Marie Beard

Erected in 1845, the home was originally a two family and was later made into a single family by Andrew J. Borden. Andrew J. Borden bought the house at 92 Second Street in Fall River, Massachusetts, to be close to his bank and various downtown businesses. The Bed & Breakfast is named after Andrew J. Borden’s youngest daughter, Lizzie.

Erected in 1845, the home was originally a two family and was later made into a single family by Andrew J. Borden. Andrew J. Borden bought the house at 92 Second Street in Fall River, Massachusetts, to be close to his bank and various downtown businesses. The Bed & Breakfast is named after Andrew J. Borden’s youngest daughter, Lizzie.

I am related on my father’s side, as follows:

Through her father,

Lizzie Borden (1860 – 1927), 7th cousin 3x removed – Andrew Jackson Borden (1822 – 1892) – Abraham Bowen Borden (1798 – ) – Richard Borden ( – 1816) – Richard Borden (1722 – 1795) – Thomas Borden (1697 – 1740) – Richard Borden (1671 – 1732) – Mary Earle (1655 – 1734) – William Earle (1635 – 1715) and his 2nd wife, Prudence ( – 1718) – John Earle (1677 – 1759) – William Earle (1710 – 1797) – Caleb Earle (1745 – 1820) – Prudence Earle (1767 – 1843) – Elizabeth Allen (1788 – 1871) – Laura Ann King (1811 – 1882) – Harriet Allen Clarke (1839 – 1898) – Clarence Clark Hamlin (1868 – 1940) – Elizabeth Gunnell Hamlin (1901 – 1982) – Tor Martin Hylbom (1939 – 2009) – Tor Martin (Majerus) Hylbom

I am also less closely related through other, similar lines:

7th cousin 4x removed through William Earle (1635 – 1715) and his 1st wife, Mary Walker (c1635 – 1676) – Ralph Earle (c1660 – 1757) – Elizabeth Earle (1696 – ) – Mary Lawton (1723 -1797) – Caleb Earle (1745 – 1820), and continuing as shown above through Tor Martin (Majerus) Hylbom

7th cousin 5x removed through Richard Borden and Joan Fowle (my 11th g-grandparents): Lizzie Borden (1860 – 1927) – Andrew Jackson Borden (1822 – 1892), then continuing as above through Richard Borden (1671 – 1732) – John Borden (1640 – 1716) – Richard Borden (1595 – 1671) – Mary Borden (1632 – 1690) – Sarah Cooke (1658 – 1735) – Mary Waite (1680 – 1769) – William Earle (1710 – 1797), then continuing as above through Tor Martin (Majerus) Hylbom

8th cousin 4x removed through Ralph Earle Joan Savage (my 10th g-grandparents): Lizzie Borden (1860 – 1927) – Andrew Jackson Borden (1822 – 1892), then continuing as above through Thomas Borden (1697 – 1740) – Innocent Cornell (1674 – 1720) – Sarah Earle (1640 – 1690) – Ralph Earle (1606 – 1678) – William Earle (1635 – 1715) – John Earle (1677 – 1759), then continuing as above through Tor Majerus Hylbom

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