Hawthorne Nathaniel

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 –1864), 4th cousin 7x removed

Nathaniel Hawthorne (photo by Brady about 1860-65)

Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne) was an American novelist and short story writer.  Nathaniel Hawthorne was born in 1804 in the city of Salem, Massachusetts to Nathaniel Hathorne and Elizabeth Clarke Manning.   On 9 Jul 1842, he married Sophia Amelia Peabody (my 5th cousin 6x removed[1], on our father’s side).  His ancestors include “Judge” John Hathorne[2] (1641-1717, see above), a judge during the Salem Witch Trials.  He entered Bowdoin College in 1821, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1824  and graduated in 1825.  Hawthorne anonymously published his first work, a novel titled Fanshawe, in 1828.  He published several short stories in various periodicals, which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales.  The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody.  He worked at a Custom House and joined Brook Farm, a transcendentalist community, before marrying Peabody in 1842.  The couple moved to The Old Manse in Concord, Massachusetts, later moving to Salem, the Berkshires, then to The Wayside in Concord.  The Scarlet Letter was published in 1850, followed by a succession of other novels.  A political appointment took Hawthorne and family to Europe before their return to The Wayside in 1860.  Hawthorne died 19 May 1864, leaving behind his wife and their three children.  Much of Hawthorne’s writing centers on New England, many works featuring moral allegories with a Puritan inspiration.  His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic Movement (more specifically, dark romanticism).  His themes often center on the inherent evil and sin of humanity, and his works often have moral messages and deep psychological complexity.  His published works include novels, short stories, and a biography of his friend Franklin Pierce.

The House of the Seven Gables in the snow. The novel, written beginning in mid-1850 by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne and published in April 1851, follows a New England family and their ancestral home. In the book, Hawthorne explores themes of guilt, retribution, and atonement and colors the tale with suggestions of the supernatural and witchcraft. The setting for the book was inspired by a gabled house in Salem belonging to Hawthorne's cousin Susanna Ingersoll and by ancestors of Hawthorne who had played a part in the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. (photo credit: Richard Scott)

The House of the Seven Gables in the snow. The novel, written beginning in mid-1850 by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne and published in April 1851, follows a New England family and their ancestral home. In the book, Hawthorne explores themes of guilt, retribution, and atonement and colors the tale with suggestions of the supernatural and witchcraft. The setting for the book was inspired by a gabled house in Salem belonging to Hawthorne’s cousin Susanna Ingersoll and by ancestors of Hawthorne who had played a part in the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. (photo credit: Richard Scott)

 

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804 – 1864), 4th cousin 7x removed – Nathaniel Hathorne (1775 – 1808) – Daniel Hathorne (1731 – 1796) – Joseph Hathorne (1692 – 1762) – John Hathorne (1641 – 1717) – William Hathorne (1607 – 1681) – Sarah Hawthorne (1632 – 1666), his sister – Stephen Hart (1660 – 1696) – Sarah Hart (1690 – 1769) – Ruth Owings (1713 – 1795) – Charles Oursler (1755 – 1796) – Martha Oursler (1790 – 1850) – Elizabeth Hurd (1807 – 1859) – Julia A Morris (1834 – 1902) – Paul Watkins (1864 – 1931) – Florence Eugenie Watkins (1903 – 1985) – Penelope Jane Walholm (1939 – ) – Tor Martin (Majerus) Hylbom  – Tor Martin (Majerus) Hylbom

 


[1] Sophia Amelia Peabody (1809 – 1871), 5th cousin 6x removed – Nathaniel Peabody (1774 – 1855) – Isaac Peabody (1747 – 1826) – Matthew Peabody (1699 – 1777) – Isaac Peabody (1648 – 1726) – Francis Peabody (1614 – 1698) – John Pabodie (1590 – 1667) – William Pabodie (1620 – 1707) – Martha Pabodie (1651 – 1712) – Joseph Seabury (1678 – 1755) – Elizabeth “Betty” Seabury (1730 – 1815) – Joseph Allen (1758 – 1838) – Elizabeth Allen (1788 – 1871) – Laura Ann King (1811 – 1883) – Harriet Allen Clarke (1839 – 1898) – Clarence Clark Hamlin (1868 – 1940) – Elizabeth Gunnell Hamlin (1901 – 1982) – Tor Martin Hylbom (1939 – 2009) – Tor Martin (Majerus) Hylbom

[2] My 9th g-grand uncle.

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