Dupuy #1436

Bartholomew Dupuy (1652-1743)

Born in France.  Arrived in Virginia about 1703 and

Marie Gardier ( -1738)

Born in France.  Arrived in Virginia about 1703.

Dupuy 1436

A good source of information on this family is The Huguenot Bartholomew Dupuy and His Descendants by Rev. B. H. Dupuy (Louisville, Kentucky: Courier-Journal Job Printing Co.) 1908.

In the book cited above, Rev. B. H. Dupuy narrates a direct line of ancestors of Bartholomew Dupuy from Raphael Dupuy, Commander of the Roman Cavalry, and Grand Chamberlin of the Roman Republic in 1033.  His son, Hugo, joined the crusaders in 1096 with three of his sons. Rev. Dupuy then proceeds through seventeen generations to Bartholomew.  Documentation is lacking, and in general pedigrees of this sort must be viewed with skepticism.  There has been much misinformation about Bartholomew Dupuy and his family, some of which was promoted by Rev. B. H. Dupuy in his book.  For example, more recent researchers recognize that there is no proof anywhere as
 yet that he was ever married to the “Countess” Susanne Levillian.
  His son John James Dupuy was, however, married to Susanna Levillian, the daughter of Jean Pierre Levillain who
came to Virginia with the French refugees in 1700.  Perhaps this is the origin of the legend of noble ancestry.

Bartholomew Dupuy was born in 1652 in St. Jean de Maruejols, Languedoc, France.  He is the progenitor of the largest branch of Dupuys in the United States.  Rev. B. H. Dupuy states in his book that Bartholmew Dupuy enlisted in the army in 1670 as a common soldier, rising to the rank of Lieutenant.  After retiring from the army in 1684, he married, and was forced to flee France in Dec 1685 as a result of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.  These accounts are derived from family traditions and recollections of descendants, as no records exist of Bartholomew Dupuy prior to the baptism of his first child in Amsterdam.

Virginia State Highway marker - found near Bocobel Ferry Road on State Route 6 near Manakin (west of Richmond) - photo credit: Gresham Farrar, October 2013

Virginia State Highway marker – found near Bocobel Ferry Road on State Route 6 near Manakin (west of Richmond) – photo credit: Gresham Farrar, October 2013

The first record of Bartholomew Dupuy in America is when he sought naturalization in Virginia on 21 Apr 1704, which he obtained on 12 May 1705.  At that time he was resident near Petersburg, Virginia.  He later settled near Manakintown, west of Richmond, where a great number of French Huguenot[1] refugees were encouraged to settle.  The next record of him is when he is named on a headright grant issued to Henry Harryson dated 16 June 1714.  This grant names Bartholomew Dupuy, Marie Gardier, Peter, John Peter, John James, Martha and Philippa Dupuy as being the immigrants that were cultivating the property at that time.  The land was 350 acres on the branches of Black Water Swamp, which is east of Petersburg, Virginia[2].    In 1717, Bartholomew Dupuy obtained a grant of 133 acres on the south side of James River, part of the land surveyed for French refugees.  This land is now in Powhatan county, across the James river from Manakintown.  This land was given to his son Peter in 1737.  Later in 1717, Bartholomew Dupuy bought 75 acres on the Glebe River, which he later sold out of the family in 1742.  Additional land was bought in 1723 and 1728.  In 1718, Bartholomew was elected a vestryman of King William Parish, Manakin, Henrico County, Virginia, a post he held until 1731.  By 1738 his wife had died, and he passed away in April 1743.  Cameron Allen researched Dupuy’s past in Europe and found that he was in Amsterdam in 1689, where his child Jeanne was baptized, and in Magdeberg, Germany from 1691-1695, where more children were baptized.  He was referred to in some of the records of that time as a sergeweaver and a wool worker.

Huguenot Memorial in Powhatan County Virginia. Manakin Episcopal Church, in the background, is located at 985 Huguenot Trail. This congregation’s history dates back to 1701 when the French Huguenots first settled in the area after fleeing persecution from their country. The church in use today dates back to 1895 and was made out of salvaged materials of a church built in 1789. Today, Route 288 and Route 711 run about a mile east of the former town.

Huguenot Memorial in Powhatan County Virginia. Manakin Episcopal Church, in the background, is located at 985 Huguenot Trail. This congregation’s history dates back to 1701 when the French Huguenots first settled in the area after fleeing persecution from their country. The church in use today dates back to 1895 and was made out of salvaged materials of a church built in 1789. Today, Route 288 and Route 711 run about a mile east of the former town.

Bartholomew Dupuy was not the only Dupuy to settle in Virginia in the early 18th century.  A Francois Dupuy settled near Bartholomew, but left by 1725.   Nothing is further known of him.  A Joseph Dupuy appears on the 1779 tax list of the old 96th District in South Carolina, but it is not known if he is a descendant of Francois or another immigrant Dupuy.  This Joseph was the progenitor of another large group of Dupuys who settled in Christian County, Kentucky in the early 1800s and later settled in St. Clair and Schuyler Counties, Illinois, and he is not a descendant of Bartholomew Dupuy.

Bartholomew Dupuy married Marie Gardier in about 1688.   She died before 1738 in Goochland County, Virginia.  Bartholomew Dupuy and Marie Gardier had the following children:

  1. Jeanne was born in 1689 in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and she was christened there on 21 Jul 1689 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
  2. Antoine was born in 1691.  He was christened on 30 Aug 1691.  He died in May 1694 and was buried on 16 May 1694, all in Magdeberg, Germany.
  3. Catherine Dupuy was born in Apr 1693.  She was christened on 18 Apr 1693. She died in May 1694 and was buried on 29 May 1694, all in Magdeberg, Germany.
  4. Peter Dupuy (“Pierre”)
  5. John Peter Dupuy (“Jean-Pierre”) died after 16 Jun 1714.
  6. John James Dupuy (“Jean-Jaques”), see below.
  7. Martha Dupuy
  8. Philippa Dupuy

John James Dupuy was probably born in 1698, and he died in Feb 1775 in Cumberland County, Virginia.  B. H. Dupuy states in his book that John James Dupuy was for many years a church warden and vestryman of the Parish.  In about 1728, he married Susanna Levilain (1709-1775) who was living at the time of her husband’s death.  John James Dupuy became a man of large estate and influence, and when he died in 1775, his will provided for the division of 2,380 acres of land, not less than 35 Negroes and a great deal of personal property.

John James Dupuy and Susanna Levilain had eight children, two of whom were Baptist ministers and many of whom moved to Kentucky and became neighbors of the many members of the Trabue[3] family who settled in Fayette (later Woodford) County.

The children of John James Dupuy and Susanna Levilain are listed as follows (all born in King William Parish, Virginia):

  1. Olympia Dupuy, born 12 Nov 1729 and died in 1822 (93 years old) at the home of her son, Edward Trabue in Woodford County, Kentucky.  She married John James Trabue (1722-1775).
  2. Bartholomew, married Mary Mottley.  He moved to Kentucky from Amelia County, Virginia.  His will was dated 5 Jun 1789.
  3. Susanna, born 25 Apr 1734 and died before 1775.  She married James Lockett.
  4. Mary, born 26 Feb 1736.  She married Benjamin Hatcher.  Children: Benjamin and Susanna.
  5. (Rev.) John, born 17 Mar 1738.  He married Elizabeth Minter (1756-1838).
  6. Elizabeth, born 4 Sep 1740.  She married Thomas Atkinson late in life.
  7. (Rev.) James, born 29 Jan 1745 and died 5 May 1837.  He married Anne Starke ( -1833).
  8. Martha, born 21 May 1747.  She married James Foster.  Children: George, Susanna and Mary.

The lineage of Olympia Dupuy and John James Trabue continues under the heading of Antoine Trabue (Trabuc) (1668-1724).



[1] For the historical background of French Huguenots, refer to separate Article.

[2] As a digression, this information is also very interesting as it names Bartholomew Dupuy’s wife, Marie Gardier, not “The Countess Susannah Lavillon” who has been otherwise described as Dupuy’s wife.  Cameron Allen in his article “The Origin of Barthelemy Dupuy of Manakin Town, Virginia, and his wife” in The American Genealogist, January 1, 1999, Volume 74, No. 1, p. 1, offers this and other information as proof that Marie Gardier was the actual wife of Bartholomew Dupuy.

[3] Refer to discussion of this family under the heading of Antoine Trabue (Trabuc) (1668-1724).

 

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8 comments

  • Michael Dupuy

    I’m a Dupuy from Louisiana, family migrated from Nova Scotia here and were called “cajuns”.
    Just wanting to say “Hello”

  • David

    The picture I quickly took of his didn’t have the dates on it because at the time I really didn’t know whose tombstone I was snapping a picture of. But the picture for his wife Mary shows the dates as clear as day and they correspond perfectly with everything I looked up on the internet this afternoon. If you would like pictures feel free to email me quinslawncare1@gmail.com
    I can always take some better photos later. They are in an area called Jennings Ordinary in Nottoway County Virginia

  • Neva Adams

    My daughter found a large 35″ x 23″ chart for the Dupuy-La Villan family at a local store. Were there many made or would it be something that a descendant of this family would want? Thank you.

    • I would be very much interested in seeing such an artifact. Is there any
      way you could send me a copy? If it is for sale, please let me know how
      much they are asking for it, and where it is. Any assistance you could
      give me would be very much appreciated.

      • David

        I came across several Dupuy gravestones today back in the woods. 1700 to 1800’s

        • Very cool. Where were you hiking? Would be cool if you were able to take some photos.

          • David

            They were on a new piece of property that I have been given permission to hunt on. I took several photos. One of them is for a James Dupuy who was a captain in the Revolutionary War

        • David – What were the dates on your James Dupuy? Was this property located in Virginia or Kentucky? I’d love to see the photos and possibly post them for other family members who may be interested in identifying who they are.

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