Ingraham #10454

Richard Ingraham (1600-1683)

Born in England.  Arrived in Massachusetts by 1630 and

Elizabeth? Wignall? ( -1668)

Born in England.  Arrived in Massachusetts by 1630.

Ingraham #10454

Note: Many facts are still not known regarding Richard Ingraham.  His English ancestry is not proven.  Claims of royal descent should be viewed with skepticism, although the proposed lineage is presented as a curiosity and as a guide for further research.  For purposes of this volume, Richard is undoubtedly our immigrant ancestor and the progenitor of the Ingraham line in America.  With that disclaimer, for the sake of completeness and as a guide for further research, I will present the English ancestry that has been published and proposed by several researchers, and leave it for others to prove or disprove:

Sir Arthur Ingram (c. 1565-1642) was an English investor, landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1610-1642. (artist: George Geldorp)

Sir Arthur Ingram (c. 1565-1642) was an English investor, landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1610-1642. (artist: George Geldorp)

According to some sources[1], Richard Ingraham was a descendant of Sir Arthur Ingram, who is supposed to have been born about 1576 and was celebrated for his valor as a cavalier.  He was a near relative of Wentworth the celebrated Earl of Stafford.  Sir Arthur married (1st) Eleanor, daughter of Sir Henry Slingsby[2], and (2nd) Lady Katherine, daughter of Thomas Lord Viscount Fairfax.  Sir Arthur died in 1655.  His sons were Henry and Arthur Ingram:

  • Henry Ingram, son of Sir Arthur Ingram, was born about 1600.  At the time of the restoration six years after the death of his father, Sir Arthur was made a Peer of Scotland by Charles II, and he was given the the title of Viscount Irwin by letters patent dated 23 May 1661, as a recompense to the family for their loyalty.  He married Anne, daughter of Montacute, Earl of Manchester, a leader in Parliament.  The male branch in England descended from Sir Henry the second Viscount Irwin and became extinct with Charles Ingram 9th Viscount Irwin, who died in 1778.  His daughter the marchioness of Hartford and Lady William Gordon successively inherited Temple Newsam and from them it passed to their sister Mrs. Hugo Maynell, whose son took the name of Ingram and his descendants are the present owners of the family estate.
  • Arthur Ingram of Barrowby, son of Sir Arthur Ingram and brother of Henry Ingraham or Ingram was born  about 1600.  He married a daughter of Sir John Mallory about 1615 and the genealogists speculate that from him the Ingraham family of America is descended.  According to this theory, Richard Ingraham, son of Arthur Ingraham, came to America about 1638 with his wife, whose name is sometimes reported as Elizabeth Wignall[3].

Richard also may have been a brother of Edward Ingraham, who is thought to have arrived in America in 1635 aboard the Blessing.  We do not know the date of Richard’s arrival in America.  There is a record of a Richard Ingraham who applied as a freeman on 19 Oct 1630 and became a freeman of Massachusetts on 18 May 1631.  Some researchers have pointed out that there is no definite proof that a Richard Ingraham who appears in the Massachusetts Bay Colony records as early as 1630 and Richard Ingraham of Rehoboth are the same man.  For purposes of this discussion and without evidence to the contrary, it seems logical to assume that Richard of Massachusetts Bay (1630-31 records), Richard of Rehoboth (1643-68 records) and Richard of Northampton (1668-83 records) are the same man, but this conclusion may be debated, based on the information that is currently available.

Welcome to Rehoboth, Massachusetts

Welcome to Rehoboth, Massachusetts

After arriving in the Boston area and probably dwelling there for several years, we know that Richard Ingraham settled in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, where he appears in the land records as early as 1643, on a list drawn up for the division and allotment of lands among the first proprietors of Rehoboth, according to the valuations of their estates appears the following:

Mrs. Bur… £100-00-00 Rich. Ingram accepted in her place…

Richard is also on a town record in Rehoboth on 28 June 1653.  He was surveyor of highways at Rehoboth in 1655, and in 1668, he signed a petition there against import taxes.

Richard’s first wife (my 10th g-grandmother) died before 1668, by which time Richard had removed to Northampton, Massachusetts and married (2nd) Joan, daughter of William Rockwell and widow of Jeffrey Baker of Windsor, Connecticut.  There were no children by his second marriage.  Richard was probably well-educated and financially successful, because he contributed a sum at the time of the general subscription for the support of Harvard College in 1672/3.  He died in Aug 1683 and his widow Joan died on 16 Sep 1683, both at Northampton.  In his will probated in 1683, Richard Ingraham of Northampton bequeathed to his second wife, Joan, but does not specifically list any of his children.  This confounding gap has caused problems for researchers attempting to identify Richard’s children.  The following conclusion is taken from an article in The American Genealogist[4]:

 “Richard Ingraham who died in Northampton, MA in Aug 1683, [is] the common progenitor & father of William & Henry of Boston, Jarret of Rehoboth, & John of Hadley… There are some other Ingrahams in the locality [including our presumed 10th g-grandmother, Elizabeth Ingraham] who were the proper age to have been children of Richard, but whose relationship to him, however probable, can only be conjectural.”

Edward's son, Timothy, is listed as one of the 150 or so combatants in a battle known as the Battle of Turners Falls (sometimes called the Turners Falls Massacre) that took place on the morning of 19 May 1676.  A monument in Gill, Massachusetts marks the spot where Capt. Turner was slain. The site of the battle is in the Riverside Archeological District, a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Capt. William Turner and 40 other men fell at the Battle of Turners Falls (sometimes called the Turners Falls Massacre) that took place on the morning of 19 May 1676. A monument in Gill, Massachusetts marks the spot where Turner was slain. The site of the battle is in the Riverside Archeological District, a historic district listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The dates of birth for most of his children have been estimated[5].  To the best of our knowledge, the children of Richard Ingraham and his first wife[6] are listed as follows:

  1. Abigail, born about 1636 at Rehoboth, Massachusetts and died 12 Feb 1714/15 in Groton, New London, Connecticut.  On 30 Nov 1655 at Stonington she married (1st) Samuel Chesebrough[7] (1627-1673), in June 1675 also at Stonington she married (2nd) Joshua Holmes (Sr.) and on 4 Jul 1698 at Boston she married (3rd) Capt. James Avery.
  2. Elizabeth Ingraham, see below.
  3. William, born about 1630 at Boston, Massachusetts and died 4 May 1721 at Groton, Connecticut.  He married (1st) Mary Bairstow and (2nd) Esther.  William acted as an attorney for four persons who bought the land to establish the town of Bristol Township, Bristol County, Rhode Island in 1680 (Bristol Township was then in Massachusetts).
  4. Jarrett, born about 1631 and died 11 Jan 1717/18 at Rehoboth.  He married Rebecca Searle.
  5. John, born about 1642 and died 22 Jun 1722 at Hadley, Massachusetts.  On 20 Nov 1664 he married Elizabeth Gardner (1644-1684).  When John was about 20 years old, he applied for land and became an early settler of Hadley, Massachusetts.  In 1676 was listed as one of Capt. Turner’s men, and he participated in the Battle of Turners Falls[8].  In 1692 John was the ferryman between Hadley and Northampton, Massachusetts.  John’s son, Jonathan (born 1676) was killed during a French and Indian attack at Deerfield, Massachusetts on 29 Feb 1704[9].
  6. Joanna, born about 1633 and died 26 Jul 1699 at Rehoboth.  On 18 Apr 1651 she married George Robinson.  George served under Maj. Bradford in King Philip’s War.
  7. Henry, born about 1639 and died 26 Apr 1714 at Boston.  He married (1st) Elizabeth Underwood and (2nd) Lydia Dowse.

Elizabeth Ingraham, the daughter of Richard Ingraham and his first wife, was born about 1629 in England, and she came to America with her parents.  She died at Rehoboth, Massachusetts on 7 Jan 1659/60.  On 4 Aug 1647 at Rehoboth she married Richard Bullock, who was born about 1622 in England.  Richard Bullock died at Rehoboth on 22 Nov 1667.  Elizabeth Ingraham and Richard Bullock had six children at Rehoboth, including my 9th g-grandmother Mary Bullock.  After Elizabeth’s death, Richard Bullock remarried Elizabeth Billington in 1660 and had four additional children.  The lineage of Elizabeth Ingraham and Richard Bullock is continued under the heading of Mary’s husband, Richard Haile (1640-1720).



[1] Refer to William Richard Cutter, New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial: A Record of the Achievements of her People in the Making of Commonwealths and the Founding of a Nation (Lewis Historical Publishing Company) 1914, 9. 243-244. Cyler Reynolds presents the same narrative in Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs: A Record of Achievements of the People of the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys in New York State, Included Within the Present Counties of Albany, Rensselaer, Washington, Saratoga, Montgomery, Fulton, Schenectady, Columbia and Greene (Lewis Historical Publishing Company) 1911.

[2]  The following royal lineage has not been proven to connect to the parents of Richard Ingraham, immigrant to Massachusetts: Edward III King of England (1312 – 1377), 9th g-grandfather – John of Gaunt Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399) – Joan Beaufort Countess of Westmorland (1379 – 1440) – Eleanor Neville Countess of Northumberland (1397 – 1472) – Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421 – 1461) – Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland (1449 – 1489) – Henry Algernon Percy (1478 – 1527) – Thomas Percy (1504 – 1537) – Mary Percy (1532 – 1598) – Sir Henry of Red House Slingsby (1560 – 1634) – Eleanor Slingsby ( – 1657) – Arthur Ingraham : Edward III King of England (1312 – 1377), 9th g-grandfather – John of Gaunt Duke of Lancaster (1340 – 1399) – Joan Beaufort Countess of Westmorland (1379 – 1440) – Eleanor Neville Countess of Northumberland (1397 – 1472) – Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421 – 1461) – Henry Percy 4th Earl of Northumberland (1449 – 1489) – Henry Algernon Percy (1478 – 1527) – Thomas Percy (1504 – 1537) – Mary Percy (1532 – 1598) – Sir Henry of Red House Slingsby (1560 – 1634) – Eleanor Slingsby ( – 1657) – Arthur Ingraham

[3] There is a persistent tradition (not supported by documentary evidence) that Richard’s first wife was Elizabeth Wignall, and her father’s name was Alexander Wignall (1578-1631). This does not appear to be the case, although Alexander Wignall is also believed to be my 10th g-grandfather through his daughter Judith Wignall (1597-1664). Note the following quote from The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, edited by Robert Charles Anderson (Boston, Massachusetts: NEHGS, 1995): “In 1935, Raymon Meyers Tingley published an undocumented account of Alexander Wignall, giving him two children – a son John and a daughter Elizabeth, who married Richard Ingraham. Nothing is known about the wife of Richard Ingraham, and this whole construction apparently derived from Tingley’s imagination”. Refer to Tingley, Raymon Meyers, Some ancestral lines being a record of some of the ancestors of Guilford Solon Tingley and his wife, Martha Pamelia [sic] Meyers (Rutland, Vermont: Tuttle Publishing Company) 1935, p. 441. However, according to New England Marriages Prior to 1700 compiled by Clarence Almon Torrey (Baltimore, Maryland: The Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1985) p. 410: “Richard Ingraham married Elizabeth Wignall on 14 Apr 1628”.

[4] “Notes on Richard Ingraham, of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, 1643” by John Benjamin Nichols, MD; The American Genealogist: XXI:3:190-1; January 1945.

[5] Birthdates, places of birth and death dates vary considerably from one source to the other. Names of the children, however, seem to be indisputable.

[6] Perhaps Elizabeth Wignall

[7] Samuel’s father, William Chesebrough, is considered one of the founders of Stonington, Connecticut, along with Walter Palmer (1585-1661), Thomas Minor (1608-1690)  and Thomas Stanton (1616-1677).  Each of these three men is my paternal  9th g-grandfather.  There is a four-sided monument to these founders (dedicated 31 August 1899) located in the Wequetequock Cemetery at Stonington, with one side dedicated to each founder.

[8] This battle (or massacre, more properly) is discussed under the heading of my paternal 10th g-grandfather Edward Baker (1610-1683), whose son Timothy was also a participant.

[9] My paternal 9th g-grandfather, John Catlin (born 1643), discussed under the heading of John Catlin (1617-1644), was also killed in this attack, as were Joseph Ingersoll (born 1675), the son of John Ingersoll (1626-1684) my maternal 9th g-grandfather and Benjamin Waite (born 1645), the son of Thomas Waite (1601-1665) my paternal 10th g-grandfather.

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