Sprague #11258

English St George flag animationFrancis Sprague (1600-1676)

Born in England.  Arrived in Massachusetts in 1623.

English St George flag animationLydia Archer (1602-1660)

Born in England.  Arrived in Massachusetts in 1623.

Sprague #11258

The following additional information was taken Certain Comeoverers by Henry Howland Crapo (New Bedford, Massachusetts: E. Anthony & Sons) 1912, p. 413-414,  Volume I.

“Francis Sprague, the father of Dorcas who married Ralph Earle, came over in the Ann in 1623 with his wife Lydia and one child.  It was of this ship’s company that Morton tells us that the new comers Seeing the low and poor condition of those that were before them, were much daunted and discouraged.  Governor Bradford says the best dish we could present them with is a lobster or a piece of fish without bread or anything else but a cup of fair spring water; and the long continuance of this diet, with our labors abroad has somewhat abated the freshness of our complexion; but God gives us health.  Francis Sprague may have been daunted and discouraged, yet none the less he took hold of the problem of self support in good earnest, and in 1633 was taxed eighteen shillings, a considerable tax.  In the division of the cattle in 1627 Francis Sprague shared in the sixth lot.  To this lot fell the lesser of the black cowes came at first in the Anne which they must keep the biggest of the two steers.  Also this lot has two shee goats.  It is to be hoped that the little Dorcas obtained at least her father’s thirteenth share of the milk of the lesser cowe and the two shee goats.  Francis Sprague removed to Duxbury prior to 1637.  He lived by the shore between Captains Hill and Bluefish River.  It is said of him that he was of an ardent temperament and great independence of mind.  That he was a grave and sober person is clearly indicated since he was permitted to sell spirituous liquors, since it was to grave and sober persons only that this privilege was granted.  None the less, in 1641 he was before the Court for selling wine contrary to the orders of the Court.  He was living in Duxbury in 1666, and died probably a few years thereafter when his son took up his business of keeping an ordinary.”

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