Mother’s Day Proclamation

Mother’s Day Proclamation   The “Appeal to womanhood throughout the world” (later known as “Mother’s Day Proclamation”) by Julia Ward Howe was an appeal for women to unite for peace in the world. Written in 1870, Howe’s “Appeal to womanhood” was a pacifist reaction to the carnage of the American Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War. The appeal was tied […]

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Happy Mother’s Day!

Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910)

Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910)

In 1870 Julia Ward Howe (more information —> HERE) was the first to proclaim Mother’s Day, with her “Mother’s Day Proclamation“.  She is my 5th cousin 5x removed through my paternal 9th g-grandfather, Rev. Pardon Tillinghast (1622-1718).  Julia was a prominent American abolitionist, social activist and poet, most famous as the author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”, a song that became popular during the American Civil War.  Follow the links on my blog page to a YouTube video about the “Battle Hymn” narrated by Orson Welles, my 7th cousin 2x removed, on my father’s side.  Julia Ward Howe is also (on my father’s side) my 5th-6th cousin 5-6x removed through John Green (1597-1659) and Roger Williams (1603-1683) in various ways (due to marriages of cousins).

The “Mother’s Day Proclamation” (originally knows as her “Appeal to womanhood throughout the world”) by Julia Ward Howe was an appeal for women to unite for peace in the world. Written in 1870, Howe’s “Appeal to womanhood” was a pacifist reaction to the carnage of the American Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War. The appeal was tied to Howe’s feminist conviction that women had a responsibility to shape their societies at the political level.

In 1872 Howe asked for the celebration of a “Mother’s Day for Peace” on the 2nd June of every year, but she was unsuccessful.  The modern Mother’s Day is an unrelated celebration and it was established by Anna Jarvis years later.

 

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Missing Winona portrait returned in time for holidays

The Watkins Home, built by Paul & Florence Watkins between 1924-27, is now operated as Watkins Manor, an assisted living community of nearly 60 senior apartments in Winona, Minnesota. Paul is my g-grandfather and the 5th great grandson of  my immigrant ancestor, Thomas Watkins of Boston, Massachusetts. The property is located at 175 E. Wabasha Street. (photo by Jonathunder)

The Watkins Home, built by Paul & Florence Watkins between 1924-27

From the PostBulletin.com, 26 Nov 2014, 4:14 PM, updated 5:08 PM (original post —> here):

Brett Boese, bboese@postbulletin.com

WINONA — The mystery of the missing portrait in Winona has been solved just in time for the holidays.

Winona Police Chief Paul Bostrack said a 23-year-old man contacted authorities on Tuesday to admit stealing the 200-pound painting of Winona businessman Paul Watkins from Winona Health’s Watkins Manor. Authorities recovered the 4-feet by 5-feet portrait less than a block from where it had been reported missing on Sept. 12.

Authorities still are trying to piece together the sequence of events that led to the late-night heist of the $6,500 portrait. Bostrack [said] it appears to have been a “spur-of-the-moment thing” that may or may not lead to criminal charges, since it was returned undamaged.

The painting is the work of Minnesota artist Carl Bohnen in 1920 and was paired with a matching portrait of Watkins’ wife. The portrait was displayed in the mansion’s great hall, which is open to the public and functions like a museum. A side door to the facility that’s typically locked was found ajar on the morning the portrait was reported missing.

Paul Watkins’ granddaughter, Ruth Watkins Fell of Rochester, heard of the portrait’s return on Wednesday afternoon. She grew up playing in the room where the portrait was featured.

“It’s my grandfather’s picture, but it really belongs to the community,” Watkins Fell said. “This is really good news, especially because tomorrow is Thanksgiving. It’s the perfect time.”

Watkins was president of the J.R. Watkins Co., which rose to prominence more than a century ago and remains a provider of vanilla extract, other baking products and health remedies. After enjoying great personal success, he became one of Winona’s greatest philanthropists, donating artwork to local schools, churches and government buildings. Winona State University has even named its main art gallery in his honor.

Winona Health, which operates the Watkins mansion as an assisted living facility, said in September that no charges would be filed if the portrait was returned undamaged. Last month, anonymous donors offered a reward of $3,000 for tips that led to its return.

Watkins Fell said she was on the verge of writing a letter to the editor asking for the portrait’s return. The appeal would have echoed a plea her mother made 35 years ago.

In 1979, one of three Tiffany lamps Watkins donated to a Winona church was stolen out of the parlor. Watkins’ daughter — and Watkins Fell’s mother — wrote a letter to the editor asking for its safe return, offering a $1,000 reward for the lamp, which was valued at about $30,000.

Shortly after making that offer, Watkins Fell said her mother received a phone call claiming the lamp was at the Prairie Island Campground near the Mississippi River in Winona. Authorities were alerted, and the ensuing search found the lamp buried in the sand but otherwise undamaged. The reward money was never claimed.

Watkins Fell said she expects the painting to be returned to its customary place next to her grandmother’s portrait just in time for the holidays — and reinforced with extra nails this time.

“I’m shocked, first of all, but extremely pleased that they somehow got it back,” Watkins Fell said. “Gosh, I’m kind of at a loss of what to tell you. It just makes tomorrow even better.

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Howe Julia Ward

Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910), 5th cousin 5x removed Here’s a YouTube video about Julia Ward Howe and “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” narrated by Orson Welles (1915-1985), my 7th cousin 2x removed:   Julia Ward (Howe) was a prominent American abolitionist, social activist and poet, most famous as the author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”.  The hymn used the […]

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Ingrid (Hylbom) Hetfield

Obituary The Cape Gazette (Delaware), online edition published 27 Oct 2015: Ingrid Hetfield, 81, of Ocean View (Delaware), died Tuesday, 20 Oct 2015, at home. She was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, the daughter of the late Tor and Elizabeth (Hamlin) Hylbom. Ingrid was a graduate of Northhampton School for Girls and Smith College. Prior to moving to Ocean View […]

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Ingrid Hetfield, 1934-2015

The Cape Gazette (Delaware), online edition published 27 Oct 2015:

Ingrid Hetfield, 81, of Ocean View (Delaware), died Tuesday, 20 Oct 2015, at home.

Ingrid (Hylbom) Hetfield (1934-2015)

Ingrid (Hylbom) Hetfield (1934-2015)

She was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, the daughter of the late Tor and Elizabeth (Hamlin) Hylbom.  Ingrid was a graduate of Northhampton School for Girls and Smith College.  Prior to moving to Ocean View she raised her family in Plainfield, New Jersey, where she was active in Twins Mother’s Club and was a Cub Scout and Girl Scout leader.  Ingrid was preceded in death by her husband Walter L. Hetfield IV; her sister Elizabeth Frazer; brother Martin Hylbom; and nephew Paul Hylbom.

She had been employed at Fabric Land in North Plainfield, New Jersey, Hess Apparel in Ocean City, Maryland, the Rose Garden in Bethany Beach and Good Earth Market in Ocean View.  Since December 1971 Ingrid has been a proud friend of Bill W.  She was a Master Gardener who was happiest when working in the garden.  She was a world traveler who as a child lived in Sweden, and traveled across the United States, Canada, Europe, Brazil and Egypt.

She is survived by a son, Walter L. Hetfield V of Milton; three daughters, Betsy Joyner and husband Greg of Burlington, North Carolina, Kathy Magee and husband Bob of Ocean View and Peggy Horner of Moore, South Carolina; seven grandchildren, Grace and Ingrid Hetfield of Rehoboth Beach, Patrick Magee of Concord, North Carolina, Timothy Magee of Ocean View and Caroline, Katherine and Anna Horner of Moore.

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, 31 October, at Mariners Bethel United Methodist Church in Ocean View. Friends may call from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the church and a reception will follow.  Burial will be at Evergreen Cemetery in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to POW&R of Autism Delaware, 924 Old Harmony Road, Newark, DE 19713, Delaware Nature Society, P.O. Box 700, Hockessin, DE 19707, The Wilson House, P.O. Box 46, East Dorset, VT 05253, Hatcher Garden and Woodland Preserve, 832 John B. White Sr. Blvd., Spartanburg, SC or Delaware Hospice, 100 Patriots Way, Milford, DE 19963.

Condolences may be sent by visiting Hastings Funeral Home.

Walter "Skip" L. Hetfield (1934-1977) and Ingrid (Hylbom) Hetfield (1934-2015), circa 1956.

Walter “Skip” L. Hetfield (1934-1977) and Ingrid (Hylbom) Hetfield (1934-2015), circa 1956.

 

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Gen. David Wooster and the Minute Men of Connecticut

Today marks the anniversary of the Battle of Ridgefield.  The event was actually a battle and a series of skirmishes between American and British forces during the American Revolutionary War. The main battle was fought in the village of Ridgefield, Connecticut on 27 Apr 1777, and more skirmishing occurred the next day between Ridgefield and the coastline near modern Westport, Connecticut.  The expedition was a tactical success for the British forces, but their actions in pursuing the raid galvanized Patriot support in Connecticut.  While the British again made raids on Connecticut’s coastal communities, they made no more raids that penetrated far into the countryside.

The Westport (Connecticut) Minuteman monument kneels atop a traffic circle at the intersection of Compo Road South and Compo Beach Road. The monument depicts a musket-wielding Continental soldier waiting with his sleeves rolled up for the returning Redcoats. A plaque on the north side of the base reads “To commemorate the heroism of the patriots who defended their country when the British invaded this state April 25th 1777. General David Wooster, Colonel Abraham Gould and more than one hundred Continentals fell in the engagements commencing at Danbury and closing on Compo Hill”. The monument was created by sculptor Harry Daniel Webster and was cast by Tiffany Studios in 1910.

The Westport (Connecticut) Minute Man monument kneels atop a traffic circle at the intersection of Compo Road South and Compo Beach Road. The monument depicts a musket-wielding Continental soldier waiting with his sleeves rolled up for the returning Redcoats. A plaque on the north side of the base reads “To commemorate the heroism of the patriots who defended their country when the British invaded this state April 25th 1777. General David Wooster, Colonel Abraham Gould and more than one hundred Continentals fell in the engagements commencing at Danbury and closing on Compo Hill”. The monument was created by sculptor Harry Daniel Webster and was cast by Tiffany Studios in 1910.

On 25 Apr 1777, a British force under the command of the Royal Governor of the Province of New York (Major General William Tryon) landed between Fairfield and Norwalk (in what is now Westport), and marched from there to Danbury.  There they destroyed Continental Army supplies after chasing off a small garrison of troops.  When word of the British troop movements spread, Connecticut militia leaders sprang into action.  Major General David Wooster, Brigadier General Gold S. Silliman and Brigadier General Benedict Arnold raised a combined force of roughly 700 Continental Army regular and irregular local militia forces to oppose the British, but could not reach Danbury in time to prevent the destruction of the supplies.  Instead, they set out to harass the British on their return to the coast.

The company led by General Wooster twice attacked Tryon’s rear guard during their march south on 27 April.  In the second encounter, Wooster was mortally wounded, andhe died five days later.  The main encounter then took place at Ridgefield, where several hundred militia under Arnold’s command confronted the British and were driven away in a running battle down the town’s main street, but not before inflicting casualties on the British.  Additional militia forces arrived, and the next day they continued to harass the British as they returned to Compo Beach, where the fleet awaited them.  Arnold regrouped the militia and some artillery to make a stand against the British near their landing site, but his position was flanked and his force scattered by artillery fire and a bayonet charge.

On 2 May 1777, General David Wooster (1711-1777) died at Danbury from wounds sustained in the fighting on 27 April 1777.  His finals words were said to be:

“I am dying, but with a strong hope and persuasion that my country will gain her independence.” 

General David Wooster is my 1st cousin 8x removed on my mother’s side.  He was the grandson of my 8th g-grandmother, Elizabeth Wheeler (1642- ), discussed under the heading of Moses Wheeler (1598-1689) and Miriam Hawley (1620-1690).

 

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357 Years Ago – The Flushing Remonstrance

A U.S. postage stamp commemorating religious freedom and the 300th anniversity of the Flushing Remonstrance

A U.S. postage stamp commemorating religious freedom and the 300th anniversity of the Flushing Remonstrance (1957)

The struggle for religious tolerance in America pre-dates both the Bill of Rights and Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom (1786).  With due respect to the foundation laid by my paternal 10th g-grandfather, Roger Williams (1603-1683) and his early experiment with “liberty of conscience” in Rhode Island, in many ways the USA owes its enduring strength to a little-known document that was signed by 30 ordinary citizens on 27 Dec 1657, including some ancestors on my mother’s side:  William Thorne (1617-1657), my 9th g-grandfather and William’s son William, my 8th g-grand uncle; also by Nicholas Pearsall (1613-1690), my 9th g-grandfather, discussed under the heading of Thomas Pearsall (1586-1667).  William Thorne’s second son, John (my 8th g-grandfather), married Mary Pearsall, the daughter of Nicholas. The document they signed has come to be known as “The Flushing Remonstrance”, and it originated not in the British-American colonies, but in the Dutch settlements in the region of modern-day New York City, which were the most tolerant in the New World.

[this post is a based on a shortened version of an op-ed in the New York Times published 27 Dec 2007, the 350th anniversary of the Remonstrance].

When the Dutch West India Company set up a trading post at the southern tip of Manhattan in 1625, the purpose was to make money, not to save souls.  Because the founding idea was trade, the directors of the firm took pains to ensure that all were welcome.  But religious tolerance had its limits, even in New Amsterdam, especially when it came to Quakers, who then had a reputation as obnoxious rabble-rousers.  In 1656, Governor Peter Stuyvesant passed an Ordinance declaring that any person entertaining a Quaker Meeting House for a single night was to be fined, and that vessels bringing any Quaker into the province would be confiscated.  Sentiment grew in Flushing to oppose this infringement upon the right to enjoy liberty of conscience.  After the edict was released, Edward Hart, the town clerk in what is now Flushing, Queens, gathered his fellow citizens on 27 Dec 1657 and wrote a petition to Stuyvesant, citing the Flushing town charter of 1645, which promised liberty of conscience.  As Hart and his fellow petitioners so elegantly wrote, “We desire therefore in this case not to judge least we be judged, neither to condemn least we be condemned, but rather let every man stand and fall to his own master.”  Their logic was impeccable: “the power of this world can neither attack us, neither excuse us, for if God justify, who can condemn, and if God condemn, there is none can justify.”

The Flushing Remonstrance was remarkable for four reasons:

FIRST, it articulated a fundamental right that is as basic to American freedom as any we hold dear.

SECOND, the authors backed up their words with actions — they did not whisper their opposition among themselves or protest in silence.  Rather, they signed the document and sent it to the most powerful official in the colony, a man not known for toleration or for an easygoing or gracious manner.

THIRD, they stood up for others: none of the signers was himself a Quaker.  The Flushing citizens were articulating a principle that was of little discernible benefit to themselves.

And FOURTH, like all great documents, the language of the remonstrance is as beautiful as the sentiments they express. “If any of these said persons come in love unto us, we cannot in conscience lay violent hands upon them, but give them free egress and regress unto our town,” its authors wrote in the conclusion.  “For we are bound by the law of God and man to do good unto all men and evil to no man.”

So what was the result?  As expected, Stuyvesant arrested Hart and the other official who presented the document to him, and he jailed two other magistrates who had signed the petition.  Stuyvesant also forced the other signatories to recant, but the door had been opened and Quakers continued to meet in Flushing.  When Stuyvesant arrested a farmer, John Bowne, in 1662 for holding illegal meetings in his home, Bowne was then banished from the colony.  He immediately went to Amsterdam to plead for the Quakers.  There he won his case.  Though the Dutch West India Company called Quakerism an “abominable religion,” it nevertheless overruled Stuyvesant in 1663 and ordered him to “allow everyone to have his own belief.”  Thus did religious toleration become the law of the colony.

The Bowne house is still standing. And within a few blocks of it a modern visitor to Flushing will encounter a Quaker meeting house, a Dutch Reformed church, an Episcopal church, a Catholic church, a synagogue, a Hindu temple and a mosque.  All coexist in peace, appropriately in the most diverse neighborhood in the most diverse borough (Queens) in the most diverse city on the planet.

The John Bowne House is the oldest in Queens and was built in 1661. The residence is the famous site of a 1662 quaker meeting that led to its owner's arrest. Historical documents also hint that the home might have been a stop on the Underground Railroad in the years leading up to the American Civil War. The structure is now operated as a museum and houses nearly 5,000 artifacts that belonged to the Bowne family.

The John Bowne House is the oldest in Queens and was built in 1661. The residence is the famous site of a 1662 quaker meeting that led to its owner’s arrest. Historical documents also hint that the home might have been a stop on the Underground Railroad in the years leading up to the American Civil War. The structure is now operated as a museum and houses nearly 5,000 artifacts that belonged to the Bowne family.

The original Remonstrance manuscript is kept in the Manuscripts and History Section of the New York State Library in Albany, where it was damaged in a 1911 fire in the Capitol archives.

A page from the original Remonstrance of Flushing (1657)

A page from the original Remonstrance of Flushing (1657)

If you are interested in reading the full text of the Remonstrance or additional information, follow — > this link.

The following resource lists a variety of books, articles, and reference sources, which offer a wealth of information about the Flushing Remonstrance, the Bowne family and the historic 1661 Bowne House, the history of Flushing, and insight into the life of Dutch New York: 350th Anniversary of the Flushing Remonstrance: Bibliography and Research Sources (Flushing, New York: The Bowne House Historical Society) 2007.

 

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375 Years Ago: The Fundamental Orders were adopted by the Connecticut Colony

The original brownstone monument erected in 1837 was replaced by this one in 1986. It stands in the Ancient Burying Ground, which is located to the rear of the First Congregational Church at the corner of Main and Gold Streets in Hartford. This cemetery is also known as Old Center Cemetery. It lists the original Founders of Hartford.

The original brownstone monument erected in 1837 was replaced by this one in 1986. It stands in the Ancient Burying Ground, which is located to the rear of the First Congregational Church at the corner of Main and Gold Streets in Hartford. This cemetery is also known as Old Center Cemetery. It lists the original Founders of Hartford.

On this day in 1639 (14 Jan 1638/9, old style), in Hartford, Connecticut, the “Fundamental Orders” were adopted by representatives from the towns of Hartford, Wethersfield, and Windsor.  This document has been described as the first written constitution in the Colonies and an important first step in the American experiment with Liberty.  This is why Connecticut has the nickname “the Constitution State”.  During the 1630s, significant numbers of English settlers from the new Massachusetts colony (some of whom, ironically, were escaping religious persecution from the same Massachusetts Puritans who had migrated to the New World to escape persecution themselves) began streaming into the area in and around the Connecticut River, which had been discovered years earlier in 1614 by the Dutch.  These settlers formed towns and communities, but soon they realized that they needed a unified government.  Representatives from three major towns came together and began to write what would become known as the “Fundamental Orders.”  This document presented a binding frame of government which put the well-being of its people above everything else.  It was the first constitution in the world to feature the revolutionary and modern idea that “the foundation of authority is in the free consent of the people”.  There is no record of the debates or proceedings of the drafting or enactment of the Orders, and it was not personally signed by the people’s representatives.  Some historians have postulated that the framers wished to remain anonymous to avoid retaliation by the English authorities.  Today, the individual rights in the Orders, with others added over the years, are still included as a “Declaration of Rights” in the first article of the current Connecticut Constitution, adopted in 1965.

“The Safe Arrival”, sculpture by Frances Laughlin Wadsworth, outside the Travelers headquarters, Hartford, Connecticut (dedicated 27 Apr 1964). The inscription, “He who brought us here sustains us still” (Qui Transtulit Sustinet), is the State motto of Connecticut.

“The Safe Arrival”, sculpture by Frances Laughlin Wadsworth, outside the Travelers headquarters, Hartford, Connecticut (dedicated 27 Apr 1964). The inscription, “He who brought us here sustains us still” (Qui Transtulit Sustinet), is the State motto of Connecticut.

There are the 163 men and women listed in the Book of Distribution of Land as being those who settled in Hartford, Connecticut before February 1640.  Their names are inscribed on a monument in Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, and I am directly descended from many of them (on both sides of the family! but mostly my mother’s): William Andrews, George Graves, Stephen Hart, Thomas Judd, Ralph Keeler, William Kelsey, Thomas Lord (from whom I am descended on both my mother’s and my father’s side), Matthew Marvin, Thomas Root, Timothy Stanley, Thomas Stanton, George Stocking, Thomas Thompson, (Gov.) John Webster, (Gov.) Thomas Welles and possibly others.  There was also a “George Hubbard” among the founders of Hartford, but he is not “my” George Hubbard (1600-1683).  He was a different man, who settled around the same time in Wethersfield, Connecticut.  Many of the Hartford pioneers were followers of the Rev. Thomas Hooker and were among the first settlers of “New Towne” (now Cambridge), Massachusetts in 1632.  The “Hooker Company” migrated as a group to the Connecticut Valley and formed the core of the founding settlers of Hartford and other towns of the Connecticut River valley.  Follow the links above for more information on each.  The Society of the Descendants of the Founders of Hartford has an informative website.

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The Fall of Atlanta, 1864

Sherman's men destroying railroad tracks in Atlanta, 1864 (Library of Congress; photographer: George N. Barnard, 1819-1902)

Sherman’s men destroying railroad tracks in Atlanta, 1864 (Library of Congress; photographer: George N. Barnard, 1819-1902)

149 years ago, on this day in 1864 during the Civil War, the city of Atlanta, a crucial Confederate supply base and rail hub, fell to Union troops under the command of General William Tecumseh Sherman.  On my mother’s side, Sherman is my 6th cousin 5x removed through Matthias St. John (1604-1669) and Mary Tinker (1606-1699).  I have not yet completed a write-up of these ancestors.  It took months of fierce fighting outside the city for Atlanta to finally surrender to the dreaded Yankees of Sherman’s army.  However, Sherman’s men were not out of the woods yet.  Throughout autumn, the Confederates of General John Bell Hood’s army attempted again and again to retake the city, inflicting numerous casualties on the Union army.  Unfortunately for Hood, these futile attempts did not amount to much, and by November he began a new campaign directed at severing Sherman’s supply lines.  In November, Sherman himself embarked on his famous “March to the Sea,” in which he and his men marched from Atlanta to Savannah, employing a brutal scorched earth policy. Sherman’s march through Georgia and the Carolinas greatly undermined the Confederacy’s ability to continue fighting, and he accepted the surrender of all the Confederate armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida in April 1865.

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The Royal Baby (Boy) – How we’re related…

Who's your Daddy?

Who’s your Daddy?

The “Royal Baby”, was born today, and we are distant cousins.  His father, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, who is my 11th cousin on my mother’s side through Stephen Hart (1603-1683), who immigrated to Massachusetts from England in about 1631 and later settled in Connecticut.  William’s mother, Diana Spencer (1961-1997), was a direct descendant of both Stephen Hart (my maternal 10th g-grandfather) and William Gager (1592-1630), my paternal 10th g-grandfather.  All of this means that my closest known relationship to the “Royal Baby” is my 11th cousin 1x removed on my mother’s side.  Because of the relationship to William through my father, the royal baby is also an 11th cousin 2x removed of mine and of my Hetfield and Frazer cousins on my father’s side (in case you were wondering).  I am also distantly related the the baby’s mother, Catherine (Kate) Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge.  She is my 17th cousin 2x removed on my father’s side through  William Gascoigne (1427-1463), who is my 18th g-grandfather, by way of William Overton (1638-1697), who immigrated from England to Virginia in about 1668.  William Gascoigne is Kate Middleton’s 16th g-grandfather.  William and Kate are 15th cousins through Agnes Gascoigne (1474-1504).

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Lizzie Borden (1860-1927) of Fall River, Massachusetts

Lizzie Borden and Ancestors – by Alice Marie Beard Lizzie Borden took an ax And gave her mother 40 whacks. And when she saw what she had done, She gave her father 41. Remember singing that rhyme on the school playground, jumping rope and seeing if you could get to 41 whacks?  Research on Lizze’s genealogy found an interesting twist: While […]

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