Trunk that survived 1635 shipwreck on display at Colonial Pemaquid

I’ve posted an article from the Bangor Daily News website (2011) related to the Cogswell family:

A 376-year-old, horsehide trunk that survived the 1635 shipwreck of the Angel Gabriel at Pemaquid now is on display at the Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site museum in New Harbor. The trunk, once owned by Pemaquid colonist John Cogswell, has been loaned by the Cogswell family to the museum for display. The ship model shows what the Angel Gabriel, similar to the Mayflower that brought the Puritans to Plymouth, Mass., looked like. (photo credit: Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands)

A 376-year-old, horsehide trunk that survived the 1635 shipwreck of the Angel Gabriel at Pemaquid now is on display at the Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site museum in New Harbor. The trunk, once owned by Pemaquid colonist John Cogswell, has been loaned by the Cogswell family to the museum for display. The ship model shows what the Angel Gabriel, similar to the Mayflower that brought the Puritans to Plymouth, Massachusetts, looked like. (photo credit: Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands)

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378 Years Ago Today – The Wreck of the Angel Gabriel

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, Bristol, Maine

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, Bristol, Maine

378 years ago today, my 10th g-grandparents, John Cogswell and Elizabeth Thomsonn, arrived on the shores of this continent with their eight children in a manner as dramatic as anyone could imagine.  After a voyage of many weeks, their ship, the Angel Gabriel wrecked in the waters near what is today known as Pemaquid Point, Maine.  They had no name for it, and it was not the destination they had planned for.  Weeks before, they had sold their possessions, boarded a small wooden ship and risked everything with the crazy idea of starting life over in a wildness known as Massachusetts.  They had never been there, and probably didn’t know anyone who had ever been there.  They left their home in England with no expectation of ever returning, taking with them several farm and household servants, an amount of valuable furniture, farming implements, housekeeping utensils, and a considerable sum of money.  The family evidently left a very comfortable existence in England to come to America.  During the night of 14/15 Aug 1635, they were cast away on the rocky coast of Maine on the winds and waves of a huge hurricane that sent their small ship to the bottom and left them on the beach with few provisions.  Not a good way to begin a new life on a new continent…  Click here —> for more on the Cogswell family’s story.

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John Cogswell’s trunk

The following article was posted on the Bangor Daily News website (23 Jun 2011): Trunk that survived 1635 shipwreck on display at Colonial Pemaquid A 376-year-old horsehide trunk that survived a shipwreck in Colonial America — caused by one of the most terrific storms to occur along the Maine coast — now is on display at Colonial Pemaquid State Historic Site in New […]

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Many Cogswell photos have been added to the site

Edward & Alice Cogswell home in Westbury Leigh (photo credit: Danette Percifield Cogswell, May 2013)

Edward & Alice Cogswell home in Westbury Leigh (photo credit: Danette Percifield Cogswell, May 2013)

Last month, Danette Percifield Cogswell (a Facebook acquaintance) and her family returned from a trip to Westbury, England with some wonderful pictures, which I have posted here with her permission —> Cogswell photos.  They were fortunate to visit with Peter & Mary Jones, who showed them the home of Edward and Alice Cogswell (my 11th g-grandparents).  They have restored the home to it’s original state.  The All Saints Church in Westbury was locked, but they heard some music from the inside.  After knocking several times a lady came to the door and was kind enough to let them view the inside of the church and take some photos.  There are no headstones of the Cogswell’s in the churchyard, as there was a flood some time ago that swept most of them away.   The Old Dilton (St. Mary’s) Church is where the Cogswell family worshiped, not too far from the Cogswell home.  Danette reports that it was well worth a trip to this area of England, only a 2 hour train ride from London.  I’ve also added many more photos of Westbury, Pemaquid and Ipswich to the main Cogswell page, including some of Pemaquid Lighthouse taken last month by my friend and sometimes Bridge partner, Steve Anderson.  I have also learned that Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1841-1935), the American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1902-1932, is my 6th cousin 5x removed on his father’s side through John Cogswell (1592-1669).  I had already known that Holmes is my 8th cousin 3x removed on his mother’s side through William Hutchinson (1586-1641), and his wife, Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson.

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Articles

Use menus or links below to navigate to posted articles: Angel Gabriel: The Search for a Wreck in the waters near Pemaquid, Maine Anne Hutchinson – “Royal and Noble Lines” of Anne Hutchinson, born 1643.  She is the granddaughter of the more famous Anne (Marbury) Hutchinson.  I am a descendant of Anne Hutchinson (1643-1718) through two of her offspring. Battle of the […]

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Cogswell #2584

John Cogswell (1592-1669) Born in England.  Shipwrecked near Pemaquid Point, Maine on 15 Aug 1635 and subsequently settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts and Elizabeth Thomsonn (1594-1676) Born in England.  Shipwrecked near Pemaquid Point, Maine on 15 Aug 1635 and subsequently settled in Ipswich, Massachusetts.     Bibliographical Note: Much of the information presented here is found in The Cogswells in America by E.O. […]

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